Koláč – A Complex Confection

A Transatlantic Treat

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The typical appearance of koláč as you’d see them in a Czech bakery.

The koláč is, without doubt, a very well known example of the sweeter side of Czech cuisine. In fact, many who have visited or been raised in the areas of America with a high degree of Czech ancestry in the local population will most certainly be familiar with a variation of the treat.

Czech immigrants to America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries brought the koláč with them and their descendants have proudly kept the tradition alive to the present and added a few touches to it that make it their own.

Having spoken to a number of Czechs who have tried koláč types in America and Americans who have tried traditional variants of the treat in the Czech lands, opinions are quite variable on how close present American types are to traditional Czech ones.

Most Czechs I’ve met who have tried American koláčes tend to say the pastry part of it isn’t quite right. This is a perfectly understandable reaction if the maker of the koláč used the ubiquitous “all-purpose” flour available in North American supermarkets. Anyone who has found themselves navigating the flour minefield that exists in Czech supermarkets, knows that “all-purpose” is just not a flour type that exists here and one must choose between three or four different grades of flour depending on what they are planning to make.

The koláč is part of a very large category of round cakes, very often connected to wedding celebrations, that can be found throughout the Slavonic influenced areas of Europe. Their forms are as various as the countries they come from.

Czech Koláč Varieties 

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The wedding Koláč, these being of Moravian variety.

Generally speaking, the Czech koláč exists in three main types. All feature a semi-sweet pastry base with farmer’s cheese, known as tvaroh in Czech, as a filling or a bed for sweet fillings like fruit or poppy seed or walnut paste.

The wedding koláč (svatební koláče) is the smallest of the Czech varieties and, as the name suggests, is closely associated with weddings and often used as part of a wedding invitation.

They are finger food sized and usually made in large numbers to satisfy large groups of people. A Czech wedding really isn’t complete without a steady flow of these. However, one does not need to attend a wedding to indulge in this type of koláč as they are also often made for other family events where a large number of people are expected.

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The standard Czech koláč, this one with blueberry filling.

The standard koláč (koláč) is the most common member of the Czech group and is available in all bakeries across the country.

These are about the size of the palm of your hand and good for snacking or desert.

Care should be taken when shopping for this type of koláč as their quality is as variable as that of the bakeries you can buy them from.

Smaller independent bakeries are your best bet for finding a good quality koláč as most chain bakeries use off-site mass production methods.

The third major type of Czech koláč is the Wallachian frgál (Valašské frgále) and it’s the giant of the family coming in at the size of a small pizza. Originating in the Moravian Wallachia region in the far east of the country, the frgál is not as frequently seen as other Czech koláč varieties.

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Wallachian frgál on sale at a market stall as wholes and halves.

It’s not unusual to see stands selling frgál at festive markets in the east of the country.

Owing to their size, they are typically sold as whole pieces, halves and sometimes even quarters. Usually, they are wrapped in plastic film not only to keep them fresh but also because, unless you’re buying a quarter, they are usually the sort of thing you take home to eat later. A whole or half frgál, in my experience, is rather too rich and heavy to eat on the spot as a snack.

Make Your Own Koláč

If you’re not in the Czech lands or in the vicinity of a bakery with Czech specialties on sale, the following links will take you to some recipes that will get you quite close to a traditional Czech koláč experience:

http://www.slovakcooking.com/2011/recipes/kolache/

http://czechgastronomy.com/frgaly/

http://czechgastronomy.com/wedding-cakes/

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