Vranovsko – A Southern Sanctuary

Idylic, but Not Idle 

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Looking across part of the expansive Vranov reservoir, one of the main attraction in the region.

Vranovsko is a microregion of South Moravia that sits on the border with with Austria and is part of the larger Znojemsko administrative district.

Nature and outdoor activities are the main draws to the Vranov region, though the area also boasts a number of historical sites that are well worth visiting.

We recently spent a long weekend in the area, while it certainly wasn’t enough to see the whole region, it was enough that I can give you a small taste of what’s there and what’s possible to see and do with two or three days there.

At that, let’s see a bit of Vranovsko:

Day 1 – Vranov nad Dyjí

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Vranov’s imposing and spectacular chateau sits on the rocks above the town site.

We took our accomodation for the weekend in Vranov nad Dyjí, the town from which the microregion takes its name.

The town sits on the Dyje river, known as the Thaya river in Austria, and is about three kilometres from the Austrian border. The town site is located inside the borders of Podyjí National Park, a transboundary park which connects to Austria’s Thayatal National Park.

On first impressions, Vranov might come across as a bit sleepy. However, it makes for a good base to visit the region, has accomodation and restarant options, a good tourist information office and attractions of its own to offer.

If you don’t have a car, Vranov can be reached by bus from points around. We reached it by a combination of a bus from Brno to Znojmo and another bus from Znojmo to the town.

Vranov’s primary tourist draws are its spectacular Baroque chateau that looks down upon the town site from the rocks above and the extensive Vranov reservoir area.

After we checked into our hotel, we walked to the chateau via a trail through a nature park. It was a lovely area to walk through, but with a significant incline to the trail. It definitely is not for anyone with mobility issues or who isn’t of a reasonable level of physical fitness; if you fall into one of those categories, you’ll want to ask at tourist information about alternate methods to reach the chateau.

As with all wooded areas of the Czech Republic, a good insect repellent specified against ticks should be going with you if you go there.

Day 2 – Znojmo 

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The two main landmorks of Znojmo, the town hall tower (left) and the St. Nicholas church.

On our second day, we took a day trip to Znojmo, a popular tourist city with important ties to both the historic and contemporary faces of the country.

From a historical point of view, Znojmo maintains a good degree of medieval  architecture including a castle complex that dates to the 11th century. You can also tour the city’s network of underground tunnels that date to the 14th and 15th centuries.

Other important historical sites in the town include the St. Nicholas church which dates to the 1340s and the town hall tower which dates to the 1440s.

In the Contemporary sense, Znojmo and the administrative region it’s the heart of make up the western edge of the South Moravian wine growing regions. As such, a good glass of local wine is never far away when you visit here.

Day 3 – Vranov Reservoir and Bítov Castle 

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Watersport opportunities abound at the Vranov reservoir.

On our third and final day in the region, we paid a visit to the scenic and extensive Vranov reservoir. Nicknamed by some as the “Adriatic of Moravia”, the reservoir is large enough to feel like an inland sea.

The reservoir is noted for the warmth and cleanliness of its water and is very popular for a wide variety of watersports, hiking and cycling trails around it and as a venue for special events of many sorts.

A system of transport boats operates to take visitors around the reservoir for both sightseeing and to visit castles, such as Bítov and Cornštejn, which overlook it.

There is a very friendly atmosphere to the reservoir. Many people keep weekend cabins there and there was no shortage of people waving and shouting greetings from the shore as our boat went past.

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Looking up at Bítov castle from the transport boat.

After an hour long and very enjoyable boat ride, we arrived at our destination – Bítov castle.

Dating to the 11th century, Bítov is one of the oldest and largest of Moravian castles. It’s been remodelled by various owners through its history and its current look was established in the 19th century.

There’s quite a bit to see at this castle, so you could certainly make a day trip of it. Four different tours of the interiors are on offer.

If you have mobility issues of any sort or are not of reasonably good physical fitness, you should certainly not try to access Bítov via the reservoir boats. The trail leading to the castle from the boat dock is steep and uneven.

Visiting and Learning More

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Passing the ruins of Cornštejn castle.

As I stated at the beginning, this blog entry was simply to give you a small taste of what one can do with a few days in the region.

Vranovsko offers much more than what I’ve covered here.

If you have a week or more and like nature, castles and wine; you may want to try out this particular nook of the Czech lands.

This link will take you to the official Vranovsko tourism website so you can see all of what’s on offer and plan your own visit there:

http://www.navstivtevranovsko.cz/en/

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Bučovice Chateau – Strictly Renaissance

One Thing and One Thing Only 

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The main facade of Bučovice Chateau

Less than an hour by train east of Brno you will find the small town of Bučovice and its Renaissance style chateau.

While the chateau is neither the largest nor grandest of old Czech noble homes, it does come with the distinction of being one of a small minority of Renaissance chateaus in the Czech lands that were not converted from older structures. Bučovice is a true Renaissance structure from the ground up and has never been anything other than that through the length and bredth of its history.

Externally, Bučovice is a four winged building built in the palazzo in fortezza (fortified palace) style which was very popular in Italian Renaissance chateaus through the 16th and 17 centuries. The chateau features a three storied arcaded courtyard as well as a garden.

Internally, the chateau rooms that are available for visiting are notable for their ornately decorated and themed ceilings.

Boskovice to Liechtenstein 

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The Mannerist style fountain in the courtyard

Commissioned by Jan Šembera (1543-1597) of the Moravian noble house, Boskovice,  the chateau was built between 1575 and 1585.

One of the most powerful Moravian nobles of his day, Šembera was able to hire some very high profile Italian architects and tradesmen to carry out the construction and equally esteemed artists and craftsmen to tend to the interior decoration.

While Šembera was very rich and powerful, he was also the last male member of the Boskovice line when he died in 1597. Through marriage to Šembera’s daughters, Anna and Kateřina, many Boskovice holdings changed hands to the noble Liechtenstein family of Austria.

The chateau at Bučovice became property of Maximillian of Liechtenstein (1578-1643) when he married Kateřina in 1597. During his time as chateau owner, Maximillian commissioned the Mannerist style fountain in the chateau’s courtyard. The fountain was built between 1635 and 1637.

1681 marked a significant change for the chateau when it ceased to be used as a family residence and was repurposed for regional administration and then as the central accounting office for the Liechtenstein family in 1720.

Owing to such changes in the building’s reason for being, very little work was carried out after 1681 to change the Renaissance face it has kept to the present.

Since 1945, when all holdings of Germanic noble families in the Czech lands were siezed by the state, Bučovice chateau has been under state care.

Rabbits on the Ceiling 

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The ceiling of the Hare Room

As mentioned earlier in this article, the interiors of the chateau are known for the themed and decorated ceilings in several of the representative rooms.

On a visit, one can see the “Hare Room” with themes of a world run by rabbits painted across the ceiling.

“Bird Hall”, as the name suggests, features a wide variety of exotic birds overhead.

The art in “Venus Hall” is dedicated to ancient mythology while the extensively stuccoed “Emperor’s Room” is themed on ancient Rome.

The is also the “Hall of the Senses” which contains paintings personifying the five senses.

Other rooms featured in a tour of the chateau include the entry hall, library, dining room, kitchen, chapel and armory.

Paying a Visit and Learning More 

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The dining room

Bučovice is quite easy to reach by rail from Brno in just under an hour as there is a line from Brno that includes a stop at the town. The chateau is a short walk from the town train station.

The chateau is open for tours between April and October with variable hours depending on the time of year. Non-flash photography is permitted during tours.

There is a small café on the chateau premises to refresh yourself after a tour.

Aside of tours, some rooms in the chateau are available for rental for weddings or other special occasions.

The following websites will give you further information on visiting hours of the chateau and what’s on view there:

https://www.zamek-bucovice.cz/en

http://www.bucovice-zamek.cz/