Trosky Castle – Sentinel in Paradise

Remnants upon Remnants 

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The silhouette of Trosky castle is easily visible from many places in Český ráj.

Built upon a pair of basalt crags that are the remains of ancient volcanoes, a pair of towers dating to the late 1300s mark the remains of Trosky castle.

A veteran of the Hussite Wars and the Thirty Years’ War, Trosky was a vitually unassailable stronghold in its days as an active fortress. Today, the ruins of the castle still pose a challenge for anyone wishing to visit who does not have a car or are part of a coach tour.

Trosky’s sihouette is the de facto trademark of the Český ráj tourist region and can be found on a multitude of postcards and other souvenir items from the area.  It is one of the most easily recognised landmarks of the region.

The Two Towers 

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Looking toward the Panna tower.

Trosky’s defining features are the two towers which can be seen from a great distance. The towers are nicknamed Baba (old woman) and Panna (maiden).

Historically, the castle had a quite sophistcated system of fortification walls and gates for its own defense. The walls were up to 2 metres thick and could reach up to 15 metres high in places. In addition to the fortifications, there was said to be a system of escape tunnels under the castle that led to extensive caves in the surrounding sandstone geology.

During the Hussite Wars (1419-1434), Trosky served as a base for pro Catholic activities. While Hussite forces tried to lay siege to the castle, they were ultimately not able to conquer it.

From 1438 to 1444, the castle served as a base for a gang of robbers to terrorize the citizens of the region from. Due to the castle’s fortifications, it took local army regiments three years to completely drive the criminals from the castle.

The castle passed through many owners and steadily declined in importance between the Hussite Wars and the outbreak of the Thirty Years’ War in 1618. During a battle in 1648, the castle was set fire to and left a ruin.

The last major noble family to own Trosky were the Valdštejns. The castle came into their possession during the Thirty Years’ War and remained theirs until they sold it on in the early 1820s to the von Aehrenthal family.

Ruins and Restorations 

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The Baba Tower.

Austrian diplomat, Count Alois Lexa von Aehrenthal (1854 – 1912), had inherited the ruins of Trosky and was the first person to take an interest in restoring them to some extent.

Under Aehrenthal’s ownership, the ruins received some stylistic modifications that were influenced by the Romanticism movement which was popular in the early to mid 19th century. He had also planned to have a staircase leading to the top of the Panna tower constructed. Building of the stairs was started, but the count’s unexpected death signalled the cessation of further work on that project.

Following Aehrenthal’s death, interest was taken by the Czech Tourist Club in maintaining the ruins at a small level.

Major restoration work has taken place since 1925, when Trosky came under state ownership. Today it is administered by the State Heritage Institute in Pardubice.

Paying a Visit 

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Taking in the view from the Baba tower.

Trosky is open to visitors from April to October, but the exact hours and days of operation are variable upon the month.

While it is possible to take guided tours, you can also do a self-guided tour if you prefer.

Beyond taking in the details and atmosphere of the ruins, the main reason to visit Trosky is most certainly the fantastic views it can give you of the surrounding countryside.

It can’t be stressed enough that visiting Trosky if you don’t have a car or are part of a coach tour will require you to put in a good deal of physical effort. Several cycling and walking paths will take you to the castle, but it’s good to do your research first and choose one that best suits your ability. I suggest contacting the Český ráj tourism office and asking them for information about the relative levels of difficulty of the various trails that lead to Trosky.

We put in much more effort than we expected to when we visited Trosky, but the views were a most worthwhile reward for those efforts.

Learning More 

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Another view of the castle, clearly showing the basalt base it’s built upon.

As popular as it is, there is decent information about Trosky available online. The following links will give you extra information and a place to start your own plans for visiting this attraction:

This link will take you to the official website of the castle:

https://www.hrad-trosky.eu/en

This is the entry for Trosky at the Český ráj tourism website:

http://www.cesky-raj.info/dr-en/1344-ruin-of-trosky-castle.html

This link will take you to a condensed, but detailed history of the castle:

http://www.travel.cz/guide/121/index_en.html

 

 

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Important Changes to Czech Immigration Laws

If you’re an expat living in the Czech lands, or in the process of preparing to be one, the summer of 2017 has brought some rather big changes to the legislation regarding foreigners living here.

The new laws affect seven areas of immigration policy. To see if the changes affect you, this article will give you a general overview of the changes and give you links where you can ask more specific questions:

https://www.ppce.cz/news-23-01-2017

Jičín – Gateway to Paradise

Eastern Escape 

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Overlooking Valdštejn square; it’s arcaded facades echoing the city’s Baroque influenced past.

Jičín, in the East Bohemia region of the country, is a small city and one of a small group of towns considered symbolic gates to the popular Český ráj region and its picturesque rock formations.

However, Jičín is more than just an entry point to the region. The city and the immediate surrounding area have their own deep history tied to old nobility. One man in particular, Duke Albrecht of Valdštejn (1583-1634), was instrumental in not only shaping the contemporary face of the city but also significant tracts of the Czech nation’s history.

Valdštejn was one of the most influential noblemen in his time and had grand visions for landscaping Jičín and adjoining localities into a large, continuous garden. While his vision was left incomplete following his assassination, much of what was accomplished remains intact to be explored by visitors.

If you decide to make Jičín your entry point to Český ráj, do make sure to set aside at least a day for for the city itself.

Valdštejn’s Garden 

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The 1.7 kilometre long Linden tree alley which leads from the centre of Jičín to Valdštejn holdings on the outskirts.

Valdštejn’s influence over Jičín and vicinity began shortly after the Battle of White Mountain, in 1620. White Mountain was an early and pivotal battle of the Thirty Years’ War and Valdštejn was an infantry commander on the victorious side of it. He received the title of Duke for his part in the battle and chose Jičín as his seat. He began the remodelling of the city in 1624.

Much of the landscaping work happend along a straight line running from Veliš, south west of the city, to Valdice, just on the city’s north east outskirts. The line bisects Valdštejn square, in the heart of Jičín, and touches seven important former Valdštejn holdings along its length.

At the south west terminus of the line is the ruin of Veliš castle. The castle dates to at least the early 1300s. While it successfully withstood seige by Swedish forces during the Thirty Years’ War, it was destroyed by imperial order in 1658.

Further along the line takes you to Jičín’s main square where you’ll see the Valdice gate tower, Valdštejn palace and the Church of Saint Jacob. Valdice gate is the last remaining tower from the city’s old fortification walls and a climb up to the top will reward you with a good view over the city and surrounding areas.

Valdštejn palace is the predominant structure on the square. The building existed before Valdštejn took possession of the city and he chose it as his palace; its current appearance is largely his doing. Today, the building is home to the Regional Museum and Gallery.

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Looking toward Valdice gate tower with Valdštejn palace on the right.

The Church of Saint Jacob was ordered built as a cathedral by Valdštejn in anticipation of establishing a diocese in Jičín. However, a diocese never was established and work on the building was halted after Valdštejn’s death. It was eventually completed as a church and consecrated in 1701.

Further along the line takes you to the 1.7 kilometre long Linden tree alley which leads fro the centre of the city to the Valdštejn loggia, summer house and associated park. The Linden tree alley was established in the early 1630s and is said to predate the gardens at the Versailles, in France, by around 60 years.

Finally, at the north east terminus of the line, is the former Carthusian monastery in Valdice. Valdštejn had it built with the intent that it would serve as a final resting place for himself and his closest family. Valdštejn’s plan, however, did not come to pass. His remains moved several times before coming to their final resting place in Mnichovo Hradiště, 32 kilometres to the west of Jičín. The monastery itself was closed in 1782 and eventually converted to a prison in 1857. It still serves as a prison today.

From an architectural standpoint, the buildings Valdštejn ordered show high degrees of early Baroque as well as Italian Mannerist and Classicism stylings. This is largely thanks to Valdštejn contracting the work out to prominent Italian architects of the day.

Meet Rumcajs and Family 

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Rumcajs, along with his wife, Manka, and their son, Cipísek.

On a much more contemporary timescale than Valdštejn, is Rumcajs and his family. They are central characters to a series of animated television tales set in the fictional Řáholec forest, near Jičín, and  you won’t avoid seeing them when you visit the city.

As the story goes, Rumcajs was working an honest life as a cobbler in Jičín when he was put out of business by the mayor.

The mayor was quite proud of his large feet and went to Rumcajs to have shoes made. When he asked if Rumcajs had ever seen feet so big, the mayor took it as a deep insult when the cobbler said he had seen bigger feet on someone in the nearby city of Hradec Králové. In response, the mayor promptly shut down the cobbler’s business “For insulting the mayoral feet” and banished Rumcajs and his family from the city.

To support his family, Rumcajs became a highwayman in Řáholec forest.

In the context of Czech popular culture, the Rumcajs stories were originally televised from the late 1960s to the mid 1970s, with a total of 39 episodes being made. The stories remain popular and can be seen with some regularity on Czech television today.

A Feel for the Place 

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Sunset on Valdštejn square.

In the main, Jičín is not a particularly touristy place beyond the Valdštejn related attractions. However, with the wonders of Český ráj on its doorstep, it doesn’t need to be touristy.

It’s the sort of place that serves well as a base for your travels further into the region. It’s well conected by rail and bus to a number of tourist attractions in Český ráj and will give you a quieter place to come back to and unwind after a day at busier places.

However, the city is clearly proud of its past and if you go there at the right time you’ll see costumed actors taking on the roles of Albrecht of Valdštejn or Rumcajs.

Jičín clearly exists for its own residents before anything else, so there isn’t really a nightlife and most places in the centre seem to close around 19:30 and 20:00 on weeknights.

It does offer a respectable selection of accomodation and amenities for visitors of a variety of travel styles. Several hotels, bed and breakfasts and  holiday rentals are available and the city has two good sized supermarkets near the centre for the self catering type travellers to stock up on supplies.

Visiting and Learning More

As it is a gateway to a major tourist region, Jičín is not a particularly difficult place to access by road or rail.

A visit to the city’s webpage will give you a fuller picture of what the city offers the visitor in not only sightseeing, but also other holiday themes:

http://www.jicin.org/en/

Sychrov Chateau Revisited

With Sychrov being included on our recent holiday to the Český ráj region, I’ve taken the opportunity to give my existing entry on the chateau an extensive update in both text content and photos.

Please take a look. I hope you enjoy the updates as much as enjoyed making them:

https://beyondprague.wordpress.com/chateaus/sychrov-chateau-elegance-in-exile/

Český Ráj – Welcome to Paradise

A Holiday on the Rocks 

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Part of Prachovské skalý (Prachov rocks) in Český ráj

During the third week of July, 2017, we travelled through the picturesque Český ráj district in the northern reaches of the country.

It’s the Czech Republic’s oldest protected natural area, having been declared so in 1955. In more recent times, it has been listed on the European Network of Geoparks (2005) and the UNESCO list of Geoparks (2015).

Český ráj, or Bohemian Paradise in English, is an area of roughly 740 square kilometers. The bulk of the region sits in North Bohemia with smaller areas spilling over the borders into Central bohemia and Eastern Bohemia. The region is characterised by a number of stone formations, caves, gorges as well as extinct volcanoes.

The area is not only one of the most popular outdoor tourist destinations in the Czech lands, it is also an area of tremendous international importance in a number of Earth sciences for what it shows us about the formation of land dating as far back as the Mesozoic Era (252 – 66 million years ago).

As this blog entry is intended to give you some idea for what you can accomplish in a week in Český ráj and I will be writing extended entries on some of what I’ll touch on here, you can view this entry as more of a chronological travelogue of how we approched it.

At that, let’s go:

Jičín – The Gate to Paradise 

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One corner of Jičín’s town square

A small city along the south east edge of Český ráj, Jičín is one of four or five towns at various points along the area’s periphery that are seen as imaginary gates into the geopark.

The city was our base for the week and it does make a good jumping off point to visit some key attractions in the area if you don’t have a car at your disposal as it has several good train and bus lines running from it.

We travelled by rail between Brno and Jičín, switching trains in Pardubice and Hradec Králové on both directions.

Jičín has significant historic ties to old nobility and has kept a good deal of the old, primarily Baroque, architecture and landscaping intact for visitors to take in.

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The linden tree alley

Beyond the arcaded walkways of the town square, you can walk or cycle along an alley of linden trees that leads to more formerly noble properties including a loggia and associated park. The linden tree alley is a little over a kilometer long and is lined with around 900 trees arranged in four rows. The alley and the park it leads you to are said to be older than the famous gardens of Versailles in France by about 60 years.

We found Jičín to be a pleasant place to stay, though most shops and restaurants seem to close between 19:30 and 20:00 on weeknights and many don’t open at all on Sunday.

If you’re the self-catering type, the city has two decent sized supermarkets within walking distance of the centre.

Jičín also has a number of pharmacies and sports shops where you can stock up on sun screen, insect repelent, hand disinfectants and other such needs before you embark on your journey into Bohemian Paradise.

Day 2 – Prachovské Skály 

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Rock formations in Prachovské skály

Taking a short bus ride from Jičín, we started our holiday in earnest at Prachovské skály, the Prachov rocks.

One can trek through the area using two main routes:

The short route (yellow markers) is approximately 1.5 kilometers in length and contains two viewing points. It’s good for getting a basic feel for the region and not too demanding physically.

The long route (green) is approximately 3.5 kilometers long and much more demanding than the yellow route. However, the green route will let you see much more of the rocks through eight viewing points.

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An example of one of the narrow passes in the Prachov rocks

As the routes intersect at some points, you can mix them a bit. That was the approach we took. Our route took us through gorges and some narrow passes as we made our way to the various viewing points.

For myself, I found the combination of sandstone formations in the midst of lush forest to be an intriguing contrast. We have similar formations in the area of Canada where I’m from, though they are of the arid Badlands type geography with most vegetation being sparse and of the low growing scrub variety.

I would advise anyone going into the Prachov rocks to wear strong trekking shoes with good grips at the very least as far as footwear goes. The terrain is quite uneven for the most part and you’ll want supportive shoes. I saw some people walking in sandals and other light footwear and I don’t know how they were managing.

Also, as it’s a forested area, wear a hat and have insect repellent with you. Be sure your repellent contains ingredients against ticks as tick borne encephalitis is a real concern through most of Central Europe.

Day 3 – Hrad Trosky 

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The distinctive and iconic twin towers of the Trosky Castle ruins

There is perhaps no image more associated with Český ráj than the twin towers of the ruins of Hrad Trosky. The castle is a highly visible landmark from many places in the region and its profile is used in many logos and other graphics associated with tourism in the area.

Dating to the late 14th century, Trosky Castle is a veteran of both the Hussite wars and the Thirty Years War. It was left a ruin after being set fire to in 1648 during the latter conflict.

Trosky is not the easiest place to access if you don’t have a car. However, the views of the surrounding area from the towers are ample reward for efforts made to get there.

Several tourist trails will get you to Trosky, but you should do your research into how long and demanding they may be. I recommend getting in contact with the Český ráj tourism office and asking specifically which trails are more and less demanding.

We travelled from Jičín by train to the village of Ktová and took a trail from there to Trosky. It was a great deal more demanding physically than we had been led to believe on the internet. It included significant inclines and many stretches of the trail were overgrown with bush. Thankfully, there are a couple of restaurants by the castle so we could recharge ourselves before exploring the castle itself.

Motomuzeum at Borek 

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Vintage motorcycles on display

We decided while at Trosky that we would not return the same way we had arrived from and spent some time exploring our options over lunch.

We decided we would take a seemingly easier trail to the nearby town of Borek pod Troskami and take the train back to Jičín from there.

It was a stroke of good luck for us that a taxi was arriving at the restaurant just as we were leaving and we negotiated a ride to Borek and saved a ton of time and energy.

The extra time the taxi ride gave us allowed us to explore the small but very well presented Motomuzeum adjacent to the Borek train station.

The museum’s focus is on motorcycles and many vintage models are on display across three floors. Most of them are from Czech domestic producers like ČZ, Jawa and Praga though there are foreign types in the mix as well.

It was an unexpected, though not unwelcome, way to finish that day’s trip.

Day 4 – Sychrov Chateau 

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The pink facade of Sychrov Chateau

After two days of intensive trekking over rocks and other manner of uneven surfaces, it was time for a day on level ground!

Travelling by train to the western side of Český ráj, we found ourselves at the distinctive Sychrov Chateau.

We visited Sychrov previously in 2006. As it is a quite memorable place, we had no problems deciding to make a return visit. With pink facades, Neogothic styling and and English style garden; Sychrov projects a much different feel to the visitor than many other Czech chateaus do.

This different feel is no doubt to do with the Rohan family, a French aristocratic family exiled from France during the French Revolution, who bought the chateau in 1820 and owned it for 125 years. Because of the Rohans, Sychrov contains the largest collection of French portait art outside of France.

From Jičín, Sychrov can be access by rail with an exchange at Turnov. From the Sychrov train station, the chateau can be accessed on foot via a marked trail and signs.

Day 5 – Hrubá Skála 

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Classic view of the Hrubá Skála region: rocks, the chateau hotel and Trosky Castle all in view

Hrubá Skála, within close proximity to Trosky Castle, is one of the more popular areas to visit in Český ráj. Marked by sandstone formations, tourist trails and sweeping vistas to take in from a variety of viewing points; it’s not difficult to see why it’s popular.

While geographically not far from Jičín, the winding roads in the area made the bus trip between the city and Hrubá Skála a bit nerve racking and take the better part of an hour. Upon arrival at the chateau hotel, the multitude of souvenir and refreshment stands in the parking lot attested to the touristy nature of at least this aspect of the region.

Before trekking through the rocks, we took lunch at the hotel restaurant. There has been castle and chateau type constructions on the site of the current chateau since the 1300s. As with many chateaus in the Czech lands, it was siezed by the state following the Second World War. Under the Communist regime, the chateau was used as a recreational home and the interiors irreparably altered. Presently, it is used as a luxury hotel.

Trosky castle, approximately 4 kilometers to the south east, is clearly visible and prominent from many viewing points in the area. Some viewing points will allow you to see the distinctive Ještěd peak, roughly 25 kilometers to the north west, near the city of Liberec.

As with the Prachov rocks, my advice for strong trekking shoes and tick inclusive insect repellent goes for Hrubá Skála as well.

Day 6 – Kost Castle

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Kost Castle

A relatively short bus trip from Jičín took us to Kost Castle, one of the most visited and best preserved castles in the Czech Republic.

Almost as soon as you arrive, Kost gives a different feel than many other Czech castles do; this is for three main reasons:

Firstly, the castle is located at the bottom of a valley rather than high on a rocky outcrop. As such, a visitor travels downward to visit rather than upward.

Secondly, Kost is not a state run castle; rather it is one of the relatively few Czech castles to have been taken back into the possession of historical owners. In the case of Kost, those owners are the Kinský family.

Thirdly, Kost is one of the very few true Medieval castles left in the Czech Republic. While most other castles were converted to chateau living or left to ruin, Kost has been maintained much as it was in the Medieval period. While it has seen repairs, it has seen little in the way of renovation of conversion. It is a particularly important historic monument as a result.

The day we visited was a bit unusual as there was a Medieval festival going on at the castle all day and we saw a lot of activity that we normally would not have seen.

Day 7 – Humprecht Chateau 

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The distinctive outline of Humprect

Our final day in Český ráj saw us back on a bus. This time we were bound for the small town of Sobotka and Huprecht Chateau which sits about half a kilometer from the town.

The chateau was an easy walk along well marked trails from the town square, where the bus let us off.

Dating to the late 1600s, the chateau was ordered by Czech aristocrat and diplomat, Count Humprecht Jan Černín of Chudenice as a hunting lodge and summer residence. The unique eliptical design of the chateau was the work of Prague based architect Carlo Lurago and is generally considered to represent the Mannerist style which existed during the transition from Renaissance to Baroque architectural styles.

I came away from our visit to Humprecht pleasantly surprised. What I could find on the internet said very little about it and it looked like quite a small place from all the exterior photographs I could find. However, it really is a case of big things coming in small packages.

The main hall boasts excellent acoustic qualities and is sometimes used to host small concerts. Our tour guide gave us a small demonstration of the acoustics using a flute and it was fantastic sound quality.

The living quarters of the chateau consist of 27 rooms of various purposes, all very well presented.

In spite of my initial misgivings, I’m happy to have seen this chateau.

Paying a Visit and Learning More

As I said towards the start of this piece, I will be writing longer entries on some of what I touched on here.

There really is so much to see and do in Český ráj that our single week in the area only really scratched the surface. Depending on time, interests and energy levels; one could easily spend twice that amount of time in the region and not get bored.

This link will take you to the Český ráj website. No doubt you will find the inspiration to design your own adventure in Bohemian Paradise:

http://www.cesky-raj.info/en/

 

A Couple of Older Articles Updated

The Freshening up Continues

As I mentioned in a post a while ago, one of my goals for this blog in 2017 is to update some older articles, particularly Brno focused ones. This weekend, I have brought myself a couple of steps closer to the goal:

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Since 2015, Brno’s popular vegetable market has undergone a number of changes and I have finally refreshed the photos and revised the text of my existing article on it to reflect the current state of things there:

https://beyondprague.wordpress.com/moravian-regions/southern-moravia/brno-the-hub-of-south-moravia/brno-vegetable-market-freshness-in-the-centre/

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On a somewhat smaller scale, a recent visit to the Zetor Gallery has given me the opportunity to fully refresh the photographs in that article:

https://beyondprague.wordpress.com/museums/zetor-gallery-tractoring-through-time/

Eastern Exposure – Slovácko from Above

Getting Above it All, Again

Regular followers of this blog will know that I like to take sightseeing rides every so often to get a different view on things. It’s that time again.

Yesterday, I travelled out to Kunovice in the Slovácko region in the south east of the Czech Republic. The aviation museum and flying club there were hosting an open day and the flying club were offering sight seeing flights.

The Slovácko region is part of the country’s wine growing region and has a mix of agricultural and industrial activity within. Culturally, Slovácko has a much more pronounced Slovak influence over it than you might see in other areas of the country.

That said, here’s some of what we saw on a 30 minute flight:

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Climbing out of Kunovice airport, heading a bit north-west.
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An example of the agricultural aspect of Slovácko.
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Looking down the wing at Uherské Hradiště, a larger town next door to Kunovice.
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Flying along the Morava river and Baťa canal, two major geographical features in the region.
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Recreation ponds and the division of the Baťa canal from the Morava river in Spytihněv.
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Flying over vineyards, or possibly fruit orchards.
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We began the return leg of the flight over the Zlín aircraft factory in the small city of Otrokovice. Zlín has been a presence in Czech aviation since the 1930s.
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Viewing Spytihněv from the other side.
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Taking in the big picture of Slovácko’s scenery.
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The Morava river and baťa canal wind their ways through the farmland.
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The Morava as it passes through Uherské Hradiště.
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My ride for the day was this Bristell untralight, designed and built by Kunovice based BRM Aero.